Trainee Experience: Louis Gosselin



Each year we make ag connections from around the world by hosting international trainees. We depend on trainees to seed and harvest our crop, but they also become part of our family. Louis was a great addition to our family and to our farm team. Last week he returned to France to continue his studies in agri-business. Although we were sad to see him go, we were happy that he gave us this seven-question interview before he left:

1.  Where is home for you (city/country)? 

 In the country, in Northern France.

2.  Why did you decide to do an agricultural exchange? 

 To learn English and to see a big agricultural country.

3.  What is the main differences you have noticed about farming in Canada/France? 

  Everything is bigger! (Fields and tractors)

4.  Favorite piece of equipment?  

 Swather

5.  Favorite on the farm job?  

 Driving the swather and the grain cart.

6.  Favorite French food that you missed the most on your exchange?  Favorite Canadian food you will miss when you are in France?

 French cheese!

The chicken burgers and the wraps - I can’t decide.

7. If you could work on, or own a farm anywhere in the world, where would that be & what type of farm/farm size?

In France, because I like my country, and it will be a medium sized dairy farm.

Thank you Louis!


If you are interested in working on our farm check out this video on the trainee experience and learn more about us . You can contact us directly or contact International Rural Exchange Canada to learn about the many other types of farm placements available in Canada.

France, Flax and Family

Farm families all over the world work together to raise crops and livestock of the highest quality in order to feed the world. Although there are many differences in climate, equipment and best practices, there are a few things that are universal. This past week, Vallotton Farms got to make an international connection personal in a really cool and powerful way; we got to host the parents of a current, and past, trainee. Just like us, they are a multi-generational farming operation, but unlike us, they produce, process and promote flax fiber. Decock Flax Scutching Mill

Flax fibre is strong and durable, yet soft to the touch, and is commonly known as linen in clothing. As natural fibers regain popularity, spinning equipment is being refined enough for linen to be used via machine knitting to produce linen knitwear. Flax fibre is also being used for industrial applications (insulation) and packing products.

In contrast, Canada’s main market for flax remains the seed, either whole or processed. By meeting flax growers from France we now have a better understanding of how flax use, and farming, differ. Global connections allow us to expand our thinking and learn about agricultural similarities and differences, which benefits us all.

Our 2019 Canadian  family with visitors  Frederick and Anne.

Our 2019 Canadian family with visitors Frederick and Anne.

Learn more about Flax: July 18 September 13

Trainee Week: Where are they now | Géraud Decock

Géeraud was a trainee in 2016 on Vallotton Farms.  He is active on Instagram, so follow him to see what flax fiber production looks like in France.

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1.  Where is home for you (city/country)? 

Quaëdypre in France

2.  Why did you decide to do an agricultural exchange?

I decided to come to Canada to work on a farm to discover another country, to discover people and agriculture in Canada and to improve my English

3.  What is the main differences you have noticed about farming in Canada/France? 

The main differences are :

- The size of the fields

- The agricultural material is almost the same as the North of France except the big chases ( which are less numerous in France) and the size of the seeders is more important in Canada .

- Agriculture/ farmer is better perceived by people in Canda than in France.

 

4.  Favorite piece of equipment?  

-Red combines

-Grey Mack truck and red Mack truck

-Marcel's pick up truck

 

5.  Favorite on the farm job?  

-Driving a combine

-Driving a truck for hauling grain and for the sowing season

- Checking the fields in the evening with Marcel and Budweiser ;) 

 

6.  Favorite French food that you missed the most on your exchange?  Favorite Canadian food you miss now back in France?

- French cheese : my best is Maroille

- North France Beer and Belgium beer

- French dry sausage

Favorite Canadian food you miss now back in France?

- Sweet corn on the cob

- Burgers, all of burgers

- Steak party on a Bqq

- Poutine

- Teresa's cup cakes

 

7. If you could work on, or own a farm anywhere in the world, where would that be & what type of farm/farm size?

It’s a difficult question for me !! Because I am not a farmer in France ! But I have a job that has to do with agriculture.  Why not in France and why not in Canada?

 

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Last one: If your brother comes here to work, are you coming for a visit???? 

Yes of course, and may be with my girlfriend.  I want to come back to Canada for visit at Vallotton Farms !!!!!!!!

Frenchman in Canada - Part 2

We asked V.V. about his time at Vallotton Farms and here is what he said...

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All in a day's work

I really like swathing, driving the grain cart when I have to go fast, working in the containers to try to fix something and loading bins with Michael.

J’ai vraiment aimé andainer, conduire le transbordeur lorsque je devais conduire rapidement, charger les silos avec Michael.

 

My favorite pieces of equipment are: Macdon swather, Case Quad Trac, driving the versatile sprayer on the road because it is so fast.

Mon équipment preféré est l’andaineur Macdon.

 

My advice to future trainees: Don’t hesitate to get up early to swath!  Love beer.

Ne pas hésiter à se lever tôt pour aller andainer!  Aimer la bière.

The best thing about my time at Vallotton Farms was all of the meals in the fields, the food was always great, and I like when kids came in the tractor because they are really interested by harvest.

Je pense que ce sont tous les repas dans les champs, la nourriture était toujours impressionante et j’ai aimé quand les enfants venaient dans le tracteur parce qu’ils sont passionnés par la moisson.